Productive and Receptive Skills in the ESL Classroom - Writing Skills - Study Phase

 

So, for the study phase what we're going to do is to show them the idea of the cartoon strip. In the cartoon strip what there's going to be are some people with speech bubbles and this is going to represent where dialogue will appear and in the bottom, there are these rectangular boxes, where there will be descriptive things happening. So, it will explain the actual situation that these people are in. So, we get across the idea, first of all, that these are speech and these are for description and we can then show them a blank one of these cartoon strips and try to elicit from our students what could possibly the people be saying and in what actual situation are they in, in order for them to say that. Once we've gone through that, we can move on to our first study activity and in the first study activity, they'll be given a cartoon strip, which either has the dialogue missing or it has the description missing and the idea is that the students fill in the one that's not there. The second study activity can then switch that around. So, if the dialogue was missing, this time, they have to fill that in and so on and so forth. Remember for each of those activities that you need to demonstrate, elicit a correct answer, before you give out the material, then monitor feedback and correct. For the final stage in the activate, what we're going to then do is to put those two ideas from the study phase together and we're going to give them a cartoon strip which has neither the situational description of the language nor any dialogue in the speech bubbles and the students are going to have to fill in both of those bits of information. Once they've done that, they can then read those back to us for their feedback and we can correct any common mistakes between them.


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

Very well thought out unit on Troubleshooting. This unit taught me that large classes usually are more dynamic and dramatic so the teacher must make sure his voice is loud and clear and his board work is very legible. Also learned about the first lesson and what the teacher can expect.I have learned that young learners are from 5years to 13 years. They need practice reading and writing based on their levels of English speaking and writing. I hope this class will give me an opportunity to teach all learners. This class will help me learn how to teach all learners.Content Overview - Quality of a good teacher - Different roles of a teacher depending on the type of activity and what to achieve - Quality of a good learner - Relationship between teachers & learners - Reasons for attending English classes - Differences between young learner & adults


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