The Future Tenses - Future Simple - Structure and Usages

 

Now let's look at the future tenses. We'll focus first on the future simple tense. The future simple tense is used to indicate actions of course in the future. So, in order to form at least for the positives when you use our subject first. It could be any subject you like, here we're using 'we', followed by the word 'will' and our main verb 'go': We will go. To make the negative form, we begin with our subject again, followed by 'will' again. Here we've included the word not just before our main verb 'go'. 'Will not' of course can be contracted into 'won't' and the sentence will still be fine. To create the question, again, we invert our words, so 'will' begins the question. We keep our subject after that and use the main verb in its base form 'will we go'. 'Will' can often be substituted with other modal verbs. This would indicate varying levels of certainty. We could substitute the words might or may for will in this context. Additionally for questions, especially, when making suggestions and in more formal situations, we may substitute the word shall for will. This will result in a question such as shall we go. The usages for the future simple are as follows. We have spontaneous decisions: I'll go with you. Somebody has just told you that they're going to go to the store. You need two things in the store as well, then you immediately decide and say 'I'll go with you'. We have predictions without evidence. It'll rain tomorrow. There might not be a cloud in the sky but I'll still could make a prediction that it will rain tomorrow. Future facts: I'll be 21 next year. I'm 20 now but in the future I'll be 21. We also have promises and threats often heard weddings: 'I'll love you forever'.


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

The important thing in this unit is to learn all forms of verbs in the Past. To learn the difference between SP and PP of the verbs. In that way, we clarify when is its use in each period. And for teachers, be careful when doing other examples which were not planned to say in the class.Before this lesson, I had never really studied the transitive / intransitive phrasal verbs and feel like I need to work on them more closely. The relative clauses are still an opaque subject for me and I also feel I need to devote more time on understanding their differences and usages.This just adds complexity to verb conjugation, but it also explains why it is needed. The use of different conditionals and reporting what someone had said changes the way we speak and which verbs should be conjugated in a way based on the reporting or the time of the conditionals used.


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